When You Should Replace Your Ice Maker

By | June 20, 2016

When You Should Replace Your Ice Maker

Most of the ice machine will be replacement of aged, malfunctioning or undersized equipment. Of course, there will also be opportunities to present bids for equipment needed for additional units being planned by existing customers, and for remodeling and renovation. If you are wondering to buy one, portable ice maker reviews might work for you.

Since ice machines may last from seven to 12 years or even longer, replacement usually occurs when the cost of maintenance has raised above what the operator considers practical, when the unit breaks down frequently, thus interrupting operation, or when its capacity is obviously not large enough to meet the operation’s ice needs.

Some Reliable Advice from Experts

One western sales representative says he always looks for water leaking out of the machine, ice which clumps together in the storage bin, or a dispenser which grinds away for some time before any ice is dispensed. When he sees any of these signs, or spots extensive rust or ill-fitting storage compartment doors, he knows that bringing this condition to the attention of the operator will often result in a replacement sale.

A southern sales representative who calls on health care facilities points out that it is usually the institution’s maintenance engineer who specifies replacements, while it is usually the administrator who specifies for additions and remodeling projects. She looks for evidence that machines run short of ice during peak periods, particularly in the kitchens and nurses’ stations. She uses this as an opportunity to work with the engineer to specify larger machines, larger storage bins (where feasible) or additional machines. On big ticket items, she notes, the engineer’s specification of a particular make and model is usually accepted by the purchasing department.

Calculate Capacity of Ice Makers

Most manufacturers supply their distributors with kits (or at least forms) for calculating the capacity of ice makers required for specific operations. However, here is a swift review:

  • Ice (in ounces of weight) occupies about one-half the space of liquid (in liquid ounces). That means, if you have an eight-ounce cup and fill it half full of ice (cubed or crushed), you will have used about two ounces of ice.
  • To estimate beverage requirements, multiply the number of servings in ounces, divided by four (for a container half filled with ice), then divided by 16, and you’ll have the number of pounds of ice needed.
  • Ice machines are rated by their capacities over a 24-hour period. That means that a 600-poundice maker will produce 25 pounds of ice per hour.
  • Ice machine ratings are based on ideal conditions–which seldom exist during operating hours. When machines are installed in areas where elevated temperatures occur, it might be well to suggest a water-cooled condenser system, or a machine with a remote (roof or yard) installed air cooled condenser. This makes the machine independent of the room temperature. (And machines which have self-contained air-cooled condensers add heat to the surrounding area.)
  • Storage bins are often the answer to matching capacity to need. In our 600-pound unit, if it had a peak use during lunch of 200 pounds of ice, and a peak use during dinner of 150 pounds, a storage bin of 600 pounds should provide enough capacity.
  • When calculating ice capacity needed, always size for a machine large enough for the maximum use period (generally summer), based upon reduced capacity because of warmer water and/or air temperatures, plus some excess capacity for increased demand. Since an ice machine with excess capacity will turn itself off when storage is full, no additional power is used, but an undersized machine will work constantly and unsuccessfully to keep up–causing ice shortages, requiring more maintenance and aging more rapidly.
  • If the requirement works out to just about the size of a machine in your line, recommend the next highest capacity machine to allow for unexpected peak demands and growth. Selection Considerations

Flake or crushed ice machines are preferred for soft drinks, particularly in fast food operations, since this type of ice cools drinks the fastest. Since the drinks are consumed rapidly, dilution is not as great a problem as it is in more leisurely operations. Bars generally require both crushed or flaked ice and cubes. The cubes preferred, however, are smaller than standard (quarter cubes, mini cubes, cube lets, etc.) to cool faster than the large, but still keep dilution of the drink to a minimum.

Most operations today do not prefer full sized cubes. For alcoholic drinks, iced tea and soft drinks except in fast food operations, the medium cube (half cube) is generally preferred. If there is not enough room for an ice maker/dispenser with the required capacity on a serving line, suggest a straight dispenser, which must be loaded manually, or a dispenser with remote ice making unit. Horsepower is not an accurate gauge of capacity. Use 24-hour capacity figures, with chart for varying temperatures.

Most of the ice machine will be replacement of aged, malfunctioning or undersized equipment. Of course, there will also be opportunities to present bids for equipment needed for additional units being planned by existing customers, and for remodeling and renovation. If you are wondering to buy one, portable ice maker reviews might work for you.

Since ice machines may last from seven to 12 years or even longer, replacement usually occurs when the cost of maintenance has raised above what the operator considers practical, when the unit breaks down frequently, thus interrupting operation, or when its capacity is obviously not large enough to meet the operation’s ice needs.

Some Reliable Advice from Experts

One western sales representative says he always looks for water leaking out of the machine, ice which clumps together in the storage bin, or a dispenser which grinds away for some time before any ice is dispensed. When he sees any of these signs, or spots extensive rust or ill-fitting storage compartment doors, he knows that bringing this condition to the attention of the operator will often result in a replacement sale.

A southern sales representative who calls on health care facilities points out that it is usually the institution’s maintenance engineer who specifies replacements, while it is usually the administrator who specifies for additions and remodeling projects. She looks for evidence that machines run short of ice during peak periods, particularly in the kitchens and nurses’ stations. She uses this as an opportunity to work with the engineer to specify larger machines, larger storage bins (where feasible) or additional machines. On big ticket items, she notes, the engineer’s specification of a particular make and model is usually accepted by the purchasing department.

Calculate Capacity of Ice Makers

Most manufacturers supply their distributors with kits (or at least forms) for calculating the capacity of ice makers required for specific operations. However, here is a swift review:

  • Ice (in ounces of weight) occupies about one-half the space of liquid (in liquid ounces). That means, if you have an eight-ounce cup and fill it half full of ice (cubed or crushed), you will have used about two ounces of ice.
  • To estimate beverage requirements, multiply the number of servings in ounces, divided by four (for a container half filled with ice), then divided by 16, and you’ll have the number of pounds of ice needed.
  • Ice machines are rated by their capacities over a 24-hour period. That means that a 600-poundice maker will produce 25 pounds of ice per hour.
  • Ice machine ratings are based on ideal conditions–which seldom exist during operating hours. When machines are installed in areas where elevated temperatures occur, it might be well to suggest a water-cooled condenser system, or a machine with a remote (roof or yard) installed air cooled condenser. This makes the machine independent of the room temperature. (And machines which have self-contained air-cooled condensers add heat to the surrounding area.)
  • Storage bins are often the answer to matching capacity to need. In our 600-pound unit, if it had a peak use during lunch of 200 pounds of ice, and a peak use during dinner of 150 pounds, a storage bin of 600 pounds should provide enough capacity.
  • When calculating ice capacity needed, always size for a machine large enough for the maximum use period (generally summer), based upon reduced capacity because of warmer water and/or air temperatures, plus some excess capacity for increased demand. Since an ice machine with excess capacity will turn itself off when storage is full, no additional power is used, but an undersized machine will work constantly and unsuccessfully to keep up–causing ice shortages, requiring more maintenance and aging more rapidly.
  • If the requirement works out to just about the size of a machine in your line, recommend the next highest capacity machine to allow for unexpected peak demands and growth. Selection Considerations

Flake or crushed ice machines are preferred for soft drinks, particularly in fast food operations, since this type of ice cools drinks the fastest. Since the drinks are consumed rapidly, dilution is not as great a problem as it is in more leisurely operations. Bars generally require both crushed or flaked ice and cubes. The cubes preferred, however, are smaller than standard (quarter cubes, mini cubes, cube lets, etc.) to cool faster than the large, but still keep dilution of the drink to a minimum.

Most operations today do not prefer full sized cubes. For alcoholic drinks, iced tea and soft drinks except in fast food operations, the medium cube (half cube) is generally preferred. If there is not enough room for an ice maker/dispenser with the required capacity on a serving line, suggest a straight dispenser, which must be loaded manually, or a dispenser with remote ice making unit. Horsepower is not an accurate gauge of capacity. Use 24-hour capacity figures, with chart for varying temperatures.

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